Tuesday, August, 20, 2019 04:35:09

Flex will come with a set-top box for streaming, which will include Prime Video, Netflix, HBO and other applications, bringing together content into a single integrated guide

Comcast has recently introduced its new streaming platform, called Flex, which is aimed at non-cable customers who have subscribed to the company’s broadband internet service. The monthly charges for Flex would be $5 and it will also come with a set-top box for streaming, which will include Prime Video, Netflix, HBO and other applications, along with Comcast’s X1 voice remote.

Reportedly, the service would be launching on 26 March this year and will be available for all Comcast Xfinity internet customers across the U.S. The company claims that Flex will bring together content from the above applications into a single integrated guide, where users can find something to see and then switch over to the app to view it.

Sources with knowledge on the matter said that customers can pair their Movies Anywhere account with their Xfinity login, with music apps such as iHeartRadio and Pandora coming pre-installed on the device. Apparently, Comcast is looking to stay clear of cable alternatives, due to which YouTube TV, DirectTV Now, PlayStation Vue, Sling TV and Hulu with Live TV would not be available on the Flex.

The hardware box accompanying the Flex platform is HDR and 4K compatible, sources informed. Customers would also be able to monitor their Comcast Wi-Fi network as well as access smart devices in their home, such as security cameras, via the Flex. Xfinity internet customers can therefore easily access their entertainment, see which devices are connected to their network, pause Wi-Fi access and even set parental controls.

Sources added that voice control could also be used by customers to access their camera feeds, arm and disarm home security systems and search for their Xfinity Mobile phones on the TV.

Supposedly, this move from Comcast has come before Apple’s event on 25 March 2019, where the company could showcase some of its original programming and look push into bundled video subscriptions.